SENIORS’ CARE

The nuclear family as we define it now, with mom, dad, and kids often isolated from extended family, was not the norm for most of human history.
Our fragmenting into smaller and smaller, and ever more isolated, family units has hurt us. All of us grow less autonomous and needier with age. Words like “inconvenient” and “burden”, used for decades to justify legalized abortion, are now being used for others.

The baby boomers, that make up today’s elderly, who is caring for them? Our loneliness epidemic is, even more, a cultural problem than a math problem.

In 2016, persons aged 65 years and over accounted for 17.6% of the population in Windsor compared to 16.9% for Canada. The median age in Windsor is 41.4 years compared to 41.2 years for Canada.

In terms of sheer numbers, the 2016 census puts Windsor at 56,765 seniors versus 50,005 kids. The baby boomers are retiring: In the next censuses, we’ll see increasing numbers in the senior population … And our community is aging a little faster than the rest of the country.

From the time I spent, knocking on doors, I realized that Seniors are such an integral part of our WARD 7 community as far as their knowledge, especially those that have lived here for so long. While the healthcare system is a mandate of the Provincial government, the city has to identify ways to make the lives of our seniors more vibrant here. Seniors don’t have to leave this town that they love so much and that they’ve raised their families in. 

In 2018, I took part in the ” meet-and-greet with municipal candidates” event organized by CARP, and the main issues raised were health care, public transportation, and affordable housing.

CARP, an advocacy organization for elderly Canadians, set up a meet-and-greet for Windsor seniors and candidates. (Picture from CBC News, Posted on Oct 02, 2018 … Katerina Georgieva/CBC)

Once elected as your City Councillor, I will bring to the table:

  • Solutions to solve affordability issues in the town, including those related to affordable housing obligations, which would help outside of just trying to lower taxes;

  • What we can do in town to make it more affordable or just make it more enjoyable

  • Ideas to create a number of recreational or otherwise community-oriented events that are catered to older residents of the town.

Our kids, after all, are watching. One day, they’ll have to decide how much of a burden we are to them.